Eric A Jackson JP

Location: Pontefract, West Yorkshire
About me...

I’ve a life-long interest in history, especially local and social history, the kind that relates to real people and I love sharing my passion with others. I’ve been actively engaged in family and local history for over thirty years and have written many articles for various publications on some of the subjects of my talks. I am a former trustee of the Federation of Family History Societies; a trustee of the Pontefract & Ackworth Almshouse Charity and secretary of the Pontefract & District Family History Society. Until 2016 I had been a magistrate for twenty four years and I have a keen interest in the history of the office of Justice of the Peace. I enjoy travel, meeting new people, helping them in their research and talking to them about subjects that interest me, and which hopefully they will also find interesting.

About my Talks...

All my talks are accompanied by PowerPoint presentations, I have my own screen, projector extension lead and computer, all I will need from you is a power outlet and a table. Talks last for between 35 and 50 minutes and I’m always happy to take questions afterwards.

Fee:

Fee: £35 + travel expenses @25p/mile for over 15 mile radius of Pontefract in West Yorkshire

I’m based in Pontefract, West Yorkshire and I am happy to travel throughout the north of England including Yorkshire, Derbyshire, County Durham, Manchester, Lancashire, and Nottinghamshire – and can occasionally be available at short notice, just give me a ring or email me.

My Contact Details:
Phone:

01977 791087

After You’re Dead

Public Speaker Eric A Jackson talks about grave robbing in his talk After Your Are Dead

The history of dissection, its use as a punishment and how grave robbing fed the need for bodies to be used for anatomical dissection. The measures people took to prevent their corpse being stolen, the stories of Burke and Hare and of  Margorie McCall, the “Lady with the Ring”, who reputedly died once and was buried twice, and some more recent cases of body-snatching – not as gruesome as it sounds, it is presented in a light-hearted tone.

The Pontefract Murder

Public Speaker Eric A Jackson talks about The Pontefract Murder

In the closing days of World War One two soldiers, deserters from the Army Service Corps, robbed and brutally murdered the elderly widowed owner of a jeweller’s shop.
Fleeing with their ill-gotten gains it was only a matter of days before they were apprehended 200 miles away from the scene of their crime, partly because one of them proudly carried 6 wound stripes on his uniform sleeve, signifying his bravery whilst fighting in France, but which marked him out and led to his arrest.
At their subsequent trial each blamed the other for the crime, but to no avail for the law was clear – “a person who commits a felony involving personal violence, does so at his own risk, & is guilty of murder if the other person, in the course of carrying out that common design, does an act which causes the death”.
Both men were hanged together just 20 weeks after their crime, justice was indeed swift back then.

Barnbow

Public Speaker Eric A Jackson talks about Barnbow and the tragic WW1  munitions accident there of 1916.

The failure of British artillery in the early part of WWI, the ‘shell crisis’ of 1915 and the subsequent development of Munitions Works such as that at Barnbow to the east of Leeds, and the tragic accident there in 1916

Remembrance

Public Speaker Eric A Jackson talks about  Remembrance and the  selection of the Unknown Warrior after WWI

The establishment of War Memorials, why and how they were built and the various forms remembrance took in the aftermath of World War One. The building of the Cenotaph in Whitehall and the selection and home-coming of the Unknown Warrior to mark the first Remembrance Day on 11 November 1920.

 

The Kingdom of Alms

Public Speaker Eric A Jackson talks about the kingdom of alms.jpg

Almshouses had their origins as medieval hospitals, which were run as part of the monastic system. Later, landed gentry built them on their large estates for their infirm workers as did wealthy merchants in towns and cities as an act of Christian virtue. In Victorian times the tradition was revived, in part due to the influence of the philanthropic movement but also again as an act of Christian virtue.
Many monasteries had both an Infirmary and a hospital, one for the sick and one for travellers. Almshouses were originally solely monastic institutions and  by the middle of the 1500s there were about 800 mediaeval hospitals spread across the country but following the dissolution of the monasteries, only a handful remained.
This is the story of how a small West Riding town became famous as ‘The Kingdom of Alms’ due to the number of hospitals, or almshouses, erected in the town during the post- dissolution period and continues in the present day.

Culloden

Public Speaker Eric A Jackson talks about  The Battle of Culloden.

The last battle fought on British soil, covering the succession to the British Crown and the reasons behind the Stuart cause, the conflicts of 1745 and their aftermath.

 

Armistice

Public Speaker Eric A Jackson talks about how WW1 ended.

How the First World War ended. The factors both political and military which brought about the end of the conflict; the allied victory; the Treaty of Versailles and the consequences. Especially relevant in the 100th anniversary year.

The History of the English Canals - From 1759 to the present day.

Public Speaker Eric A Jackson talks about The History of Our Canals.

Why and how they were built and who by. Their ‘golden age’ and subsequent replacement first by railways and later by roads, and their renascence as a major leisure facility.

Eric A Jackson JP Contact Details:
Phone:

01977 791087