Gary Powell

Location: Sheringham, Norfolk
About me...

I am a retired police officer. I served in the British police for 33yrs, most of my service spent in London. During my service I fell in love with London and its people (well most of them). My passion is London history and I have recently written and published a book called Square London which is a social history of the iconic London square. When I retired from the police I was training officers in behavioural detection (body language) of criminals and terrorists, I have continued to do this in a part-time capacity both in the UK and abroad. I also guide a walk around some of London’s streets with a theme of Terror, Murder and Kidnap. I am a qualified guide at St Paul’s Cathedral

About my talks...

This is a power point presentation (although I promise it is not death by power-point) and I require only a screen (or a clear wall).. The talk is for 45 minutes followed by a Q&A session which will last as long as the questions keep coming.

Fee:

My fee is £75 plus travel expenses which are negotiable but will always be kept to a minimum.

I am based in Norfolk and am willing to travel anywhere in Norfolk.

My Contact Details:
Phone:

07738 426017

Featured Talk - new in 2016

Cases That Made British Criminal History

Talk by Public Speaker Gary Powell

A murder conviction secured using fingerprint or DNA evidence for the first time in British courts. The first women to lead a prosecution and the defence of a murder suspect. The first use of the electric telegram system, in a criminal case, to identify and arrest a murderer. Just a few of the interesting cases studied in this 45 min talk.

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A Copper's Guide to the Dark Secrets of London's Squares

1.Square London

From Copper to Author about my life as a London cop and how that developed into being a published author. The talk deals with some of the experiences that shaped my career, the sights and sounds that influenced me into writing a book on an aspect of London history that has suffered past historical neglect and link the London Square to events of national and international importance. The subjects covered in the talk are diverse:
London’s notorious slum landlord

A cold-blooded murder resulting in the last person ever to be hung for the murder of a police officer

The original ‘Albert Square’ from the BBC’s Eastenders

A woman who claimed to have given birth to a rabbit thus ending the illustrious career of a Royal surgeon

St Paul’s Cathedral – An Unusual Guide

Garry Powel2

St Paul’s Cathedral is the Nation’s Cathedral. Although this is believed to be the fifth cathedral on the site it has certainly been a place of Christian worship since 604. Gary Powell is a qualified St Paul’s guide; his talk covers many interesting aspects of the cathedral not normally highlighted on a tour. The building itself is a magnificent structure that will take your breath away should you visit, but Gary’s talk highlights the people that have passed through – or indeed ended life’s journey here – over the last three hundred years.
Gary’s talk will include: a Bishop of London’s near death experience with the Women’s suffragette movement, Lord Horatio Nelson’s astonishing secret, the first American to die for the allied cause during WW2, a respected caricaturist and Charles Dickens’ book illustrator with a sensational secret in the next street, Queen Victoria’s favourite artist who was a Lord for a day; and many more.
The talk will last for about 45 minutes with a Question and Answer session on its completion.

 

Death in Disguise – The Amazing True Story of the Chelsea Murders

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Death in Disguise – The Amazing True Story of the Chelsea Murders

Violent crime in Chelsea, West London, in 1870, was negligible. This developing suburb of Greater London bore little resemblance to Whitechapel, an area that eighteen years later would witness some of the most savage murders in British history. However, the residents of Chelsea were about to discover that violent murder can occur in any community. The events of May 1870, resulting in the brutal deaths of two of its residents, including a man of God, would attract the attention of a nation as the detective branch of Scotland Yard put together the evidential pieces of this extraordinary crime.
This talk examines the facts from a detective’s viewpoint and asks the questions of its audience: if you were a member of the jury listening to a prosecution case that had not substantiated a motive, found a murder weapon or even proved that the defendant had been at the murder scenes at the relevant times would you have condemned him to the hangman’s rope? Or would you have no doubts that the weight of evidence against the accused pointed to his guilt and that the rope was a just punishment for such despicable crimes?
This is a case that examines the effectiveness of policing in Victorian England and a judicial system that was prejudice to the accused. The talk will last for 45 minutes with the opportunity for questions.