Maggie Cotton

Location: Birmingham
About The Speaker...

Maggie Cotton was the first female to play as a percussionist in a UK professional Orchestra. She studied for one year at the Royal Academy of Music in London, not receiving a grant from her local authority as she was told that she was the wrong sex playing the wrong instruments: all those ‘boys toys’ at the back of an orchestra. Her interest in music began with piano at the age of 6yrs, but eventually orchestral music became an all-consuming passion.
She has travelled world-wide as a member of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra – (18 years with Simon Rattle). Now retired from playing but reviewing concerts for the Birmingham Post after a substantial spell teaching youngsters, writing articles and three books. A quirky sense of humour reaches out to non musicians with instrumental illustrations giving much food for thought in her talks.
Mum to two, granny to two . . . so pretty ‘normal’ in spite of an unusual career choice!

About her Talks...

I’m a ‘stand alone’ speaker, so I require only a table and a glass of water, please.

Fee:

£65 Plus travel expenses where applicable.
Anywhere further than 50 miles is negotiable.

My Contact Details:
Phone:

0121 449 3196

Wrong Sex, Wrong Instrument: Orchestral Notes.

1.Wrong Sex Wrong Instrument, Maggie Cotton 320x240

This reveals the way an orchestra works behind those closed doors, travelling world-wide under the thrall of every kind of stick-waver. The conductor is the overt boss, but never forget – we are the ones who deliver the magic by fair means or foul; a rare way to earn a living, with endless tales to tell.

Do Buterflies Sing?

2. Maggie Cotton butterfl320x240y

Working with disabled youngsters – particularly severe hearing-impaired. Involving conductors, soloists, orchestral players, teachers and listeners. A huge learning curve for all, full of truly life-changing experiences: laughter and amazement.

Red Light District

3. Maggie Cotton Red Light 240

Lifting the lid off the unexpected mad world of record making. Nerves, hysteria, distractions, mind-blowing concentration, minute details . . . all in a day’s work. Laughter and near suicide too.